The Scandinavian way to tackle winter



The cosy Scandinavian concept of hygge has become popular around the world in recent years, but during long winters there is another idea that helps with the wellbeing of Nordic people. Friluftsliv is a philosophy that was first popularised in Nordic culture in the 1800s, and appeared in a poem by Norwegian writer Henrik Ibsen.

Now Friluftsliv is a word used by Swedes, Danes and Norwegians. It translates literally as ‘fresh-air life’, and is all about embracing the great outdoors whatever the weather, being active, and immersing yourself in nature.

Scandinavians spend time outdoors no matter what season it is. For Kim Lindqvist of the Swedish Outdoor Association, Friluftsliv means “to be outdoors and in the air, and just enjoy it in nature. To listen to the leaves, or watch the clouds”.

Many find it helps their sense of wellbeing. “We come from the hunter-gatherers, so this is really our natural environment,” says Philip Persson. “And to step outside from the city and go back to nature really makes you feel better.”

Click on the video above to find out more.

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